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Bshredder
Post #16
Monday December 3, 2012 9:23pm

Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts: 1,459
The problem with the US doing away with league-centric approach is that in Europe, the teams are in rough shape financially. This includes EPL, La Liga, and Serie A teams.

Say what you want about MLS, but I understand their approach about being league-centric even if some of the things about it drive me nuts.

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #17
Monday December 3, 2012 10:22pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,061
i understand it as well, but i think it's much the same as training wheels. When you're first getting up and running and need that support, it does you a world of good. Once you get to the point where you can stand on your own two feet, the training wheels are more of a hinderance than a help and should be removed.

As previously mentioned, this system has done wonders for our Home Grown system, because it's important for our clubs to have a strong academy system and not rely on foreign players. However, in order to really break into international club play (i.e. CCL), we'll need to be able to bring in better players.

This is sort of a catch 22 though, because you want to continue to encourage and reward our academy systems for producing good players, but at the same time, you want to be able to buy higher echilon players to put butts in the stands (thanks for your time, Beckham) and get that merch flying off the shelves.

2tone
Ten-Towns
Post #18
Monday December 3, 2012 10:53pm

Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts: 4,648
Americans love good players and big name players, but Americans love good American players and seeing them play week in and week out. The growth of MLS will be with homegrown players not foreign players. Americans are bit USAcentric we want to see good American players staying and playing in MLS. Sure sprinkle in a few European or South American stars, but in the end it comes down to the American soccer star.

USnLFCfan
Savannah GA
Post #19
Monday December 3, 2012 10:58pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,128
I don't....I want good American players going to the best leagues to better themselves and compete against the best.

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #20
Monday December 3, 2012 11:17pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,061
I think it's more important for our academy teams to be producing the young players with good skills, letting them sharpen their teeth in MLS for a couple of years then shipping them around the world. I also like the way that we're bringing back a lot of players that seem to be floundering (EJ the clearest example) and giving them the confidence to be their best again (Adu is also getting there, though slowly).

I'm hoping that we'll end up with more of a "Elite Development" program akin to what England has just gotten done setting up at St. George's Park, rather than just bringing in a few players for two week camps every few months.

2tone
Ten-Towns
Post #21
Monday December 3, 2012 11:24pm

Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts: 4,648
Original post from USnLFCfan

I don't....I want good American players going to the best leagues to better themselves and compete against the best.


Meh. MLS is rising. With most of the European leagues not on sound footing expect less and less foreign talent imported to Europe in the coming years. Unfortunately American players will the be the first to stop being bought, but fortunately in the end it will help grow MLS. Not only that players go to where the money is and MLS will be on sure financial footing going forward. Most Spanish football teams are leaning more towards the Barca system where most of their players are Spanish. Italian clubs are going to go the same route. German clubs already prefer homegrown talent, and it's only a matter of time before the EPL follows suit. Brasil is turning into an economic power and most Brasilians would prefer to stay in Brasil as long as they can get paid well enough, and with Brasils economy on the rise expect to see Brasilian clubs to do less exporting.

I forsee global football changing in the next 10 to 20 years.

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #22
Monday December 3, 2012 11:37pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,061
Original post from 2tone
I forsee global football changing in the next 10 to 20 years.


I can agree, with emerging powers like Japan (probably the most rapidly improving soccer nation in the world) and various countries throughout the devloping world (Ivory Coast springs to mind, applicable as well to many other countries), the nature of the game is bound to change. Salaries are going to have to come down some at the top level, and the lowest levels will start to elevate slowly as a result.

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