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Post #16
Monday October 3, 2016 9:49pm

Joined Jan 2013
Total Posts: 1,083
I think BB is astute enough to realize there are more negatives to bringing MB to Swansea than positives.

I am more curious as to who his back room staff will be. Jesse Marsch is a disciple, but will he leave his head coaching gig in NY to join coach Bob? Bocanegra would be an interesting choice as he has the credibility of PL experience, but would he leave his Atlanta gig?

Live490
Texas
Post #17
Monday October 3, 2016 11:57pm

Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts: 1,112
I actually see MB in Swansea in Jan also. That would be awesome.

chillguy1992
Post #18
Tuesday October 4, 2016 1:16am

Joined May 2013
Total Posts: 1,098
Swansea has really weird roster composition a lot of number 10s in the squad. For example Sigursson, Fer, Yeung as well. A number of wingers who are quick but dont score goals. A lot of not very good defenders as well. Biggest thing is he can make a number of moves in january.

hamsamwich
Post #19
Tuesday October 4, 2016 1:32am

Joined Oct 2013
Total Posts: 2,468
Bob will get the best out of these guys immediately. I'm not sure @dolcem that the guy lacks at all in tactics etc. I mean Bob and his son Michael spent years doing nothing but watching foreign soccer. I see where you're coming from in a way, but I think with better players come better tactics. He won all sorts of games as the Fire coach with a sub here, and a tactical switch there. With the players at Swansea, he will be forced to adopt a more "creative" approach if you will. I'm sure that he will do us all proud, and hopefully get some credentials in order to get a better job with better players.

Rey Regicide
Post #20
Tuesday October 4, 2016 1:11pm

Joined Sep 2013
Total Posts: 1,768
Ouch on the Bornstein and Bradley references.. but I do think that there will be a USA international player or two to swing by, maybe some of the younger guys who we're desperate to see get playing time.

I think if a player like Pulisic comes along, there is no question he's talented, you want to bring him into your fold. But I think for the players like Bradley, Cameron, players who should be and can play in the premier league, there would be an inherit bias against him because they have their "own" Bradley and Cameron. I'll use the FIFA because honestly it's a metric, it tries, however poorly, to quantify ratings. Those guys are High 70's 80 type players. England has a boatload of those, and there isn't a need to consider their international importance, or complications in bringing them in via work permits. So naturally it's going to be more obstructive for players like those.

Rey Regicide
Post #21
Tuesday October 4, 2016 1:12pm

Joined Sep 2013
Total Posts: 1,768
Same goes for Bradley, he made an "accusation" that's not sitting well with the English press that they have a network of recycling average to middling managers in the Premiership. Well yea, but if you're an outstanding manager, like a Pochetino, or a Biesla, your renown is going to be such that it's going to break down any barrier. Bradley doesn't have that.

admsghs27
Post #22
Tuesday October 4, 2016 5:36pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 5,992
Swansea to win the premier league next year!!! Lol their gonna be the Leicester next season.

Rey Regicide
Post #23
Tuesday October 4, 2016 6:14pm

Joined Sep 2013
Total Posts: 1,768
I would love that, but damn, I think the odds for that are worse.

dolcem
Post #24
Tuesday October 4, 2016 10:50pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,712
Original post from hamsamwich

Bob will get the best out of these guys immediately. I'm not sure @dolcem that the guy lacks at all in tactics etc. I mean Bob and his son Michael spent years doing nothing but watching foreign soccer. I see where you're coming from in a way, but I think with better players come better tactics. He won all sorts of games as the Fire coach with a sub here, and a tactical switch there. With the players at Swansea, he will be forced to adopt a more "creative" approach if you will. I'm sure that he will do us all proud, and hopefully get some credentials in order to get a better job with better players.


Ham:

Well first of all, during the critical years of Bob's development, there was hardly any soccer on TV at all, and no DVR, either. And let's not forget that watching a game on TV is completely different from seeing one live (on TV you only see a portion of the field and not all of the players, for one). Coach Bob probably never saw a top-flight match live until he was an adult. This is in contrast to his opponents, who were watching the sport all of the time as kids and talking about it with their dads and uncles (who knew a lot about the game).

More importantly, think about all of his opposing managers in the Premier League. Just about every one of them played soccer at the highest levels under the world's best managers. The only exception I can think of off the top of my head is of course Mourinho, but let's not forget that he was a translator to the world's top managers, including Sir Bobby Robson, and learned their trade first hand. Then all of these guys retired and became coaches under top-flight managers and climbed the ranks until they, too, were in charge of teams with elite players. For decades (from youth team players to coaches) they learned from the very best.

Bob never played or coached with or against anyone who had ever even been exposed to the game at those levels. He developed as a player and coach in an era where soccer wasn't even played professionally in the US. We were so bad that we couldn't even qualify for the World Cup in CONCACAF (and this was in an era when Central America was being torn apart by US-backed dictators and paramilitaries). His first time seeing the game at a high level would have been in his 50's with the occasional tough CONCACAF match or European friendly. Then a few more games (Confederations and World Cups). After that, some time in Norwar and Ligue 2. That's his entire experience with soccer at the highest levels. It's a fraction of the time that any of his opponents spent there: usually hundreds of matches and thousands of practices.

I can't think of a single top-flight manager in recent history with that kind of background. I don't think any Asian or African managers ever made it to this level. Heck Mexico only has had one (Aguirre). But I sure hope Coach Bob can prove me wrong. And if it's anyone, it's him. His work ethic and professionalism transcends footballing culture. And all they need to do is play gritty bunker ball, anyway, which is precisely Bob's specialty.
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hamsamwich
Post #25
Wednesday October 5, 2016 12:07am

Joined Oct 2013
Total Posts: 2,468
Look how he coached up his unathletic son from Arlington Heights into a real player who played for Roma. Like I said I see what you're saying... but- how many coaching seminars has Bradley been to? As a player he may have lacked those things but anyone can become a good coach as it's just the mind not the body. Coaching is as much about motivation as tactics, and I'm pretty sure he hasn't played bunker ball when he hasn't had to. The guy is a realist, and so yes, at times he will do what's necessary, not what's pretty. And the English and Welsh will love that.

dolcem
Post #26
Wednesday October 5, 2016 8:35pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,712
Original post from hamsamwich

Look how he coached up his unathletic son from Arlington Heights into a real player who played for Roma. Like I said I see what you're saying... but- how many coaching seminars has Bradley been to? As a player he may have lacked those things but anyone can become a good coach as it's just the mind not the body. Coaching is as much about motivation as tactics, and I'm pretty sure he hasn't played bunker ball when he hasn't had to. The guy is a realist, and so yes, at times he will do what's necessary, not what's pretty. And the English and Welsh will love that.


So I guess Landon Donovan's dad should be given coaching position too?

I'm not talking about seminars. I'm talking about training every day under top flight managers. Just about every single manager out there did this as players, and then they rose through the coaching ranks doing the same. They learned from the best on a daily basis. Bob never got that. No one around him was ever exposed to the game at that level.

Of course motivation is a huge part of it, and that's why Bob might succeed. If he does, he'll completely change how managers from less established football cultures are perceived. Maybe he'll pave the way for Asian and African managers to make it into Europe, too. One thing is for sure. If he holds the job until the end of the year and Swansea stays in the Prem, MLS managers will probably be able to find jobs in mid-tier European leagues in the near future.
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2tone
Ten-Towns
Post #27
Wednesday October 5, 2016 9:38pm

Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts: 9,134
Huh. There are many coaches that have never been players. You do t need to play a sport at the highest level in order to coach. In fact players who have played at the highest level are traditionally not very good coaches/ managers.

dolcem
Post #28
Wednesday October 5, 2016 10:26pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,712
Original post from 2tone

Huh. There are many coaches that have never been players. You do t need to play a sport at the highest level in order to coach. In fact players who have played at the highest level are traditionally not very good coaches/ managers.


Who are these managers? Just about every single manager I can think of played in the top division (or at least the second). The only exceptions I can think of are Jose Mourinho and Villas-Boas (a mediocre manager). Mourinho was a translator for some of the best managers in the game, and Villas-Boas was a scout and steeped in the game (he's not a very good manager, either). Every single manager out there learned from the best, day-in day-out. Coach Bob, on the other hand, learned under coaches who probably had seen a handful of professional soccer games in their lives (and never in the stadiums, only on tiny televisions).

There have been a lot of great European basketball players who have been successful in the NBA, but it's not like the NBA is recruiting coaches from the European leagues. The only Europeans that'll ever coach in the NBA are the ones that played there (and learned from NBA coaches). I've always suspected it'd be the same in soccer-that the first Americans who'll be able to coach in Europe (in the top leagues, at least) are the ones that played there (Berhalter, Cherundolo, etc.). But Swansea is a perfect fit for Coach Bob (English team trying to avoid relegation) so hopefully he'll prove me wrong.
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2tone
Ten-Towns
Post #29
Thursday October 6, 2016 2:56am

Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts: 9,134
Arrigo Sachi, Carlos Alberto Perriera, Arsene Wenger, Gerard Houlier, Rafael Benitez. Just to name a few. There have been plenty that only played amateur or lower division leagues.

It's a fallacy to say Bob won't be successfully because he never played professionally. In fact Sir Alex Ferguson has stated in the past how good of a coach Bradley Sr. is, and felt Bob would eventually get a shot with a Premier League team.

stone88
Post #30
Thursday October 6, 2016 3:25am

Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts: 1,452
Look a Jose Mourinho's glorious senior career. 7 Years 95 appearances with such powerhouses like Rio Ave and Comercio e Industria.

Years Team Apps (Gls)
1980-1982 Rio Ave 16 (2)
1982-1983 Belenenses 16 (2)
1983-1985 Sesimbra 35 (1)
1985-1987 Comércio e Indústria 27 (8)

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