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BG6
Post #16
Saturday July 23, 2016 12:58am

Joined May 2014
Total Posts: 72
Original post from 2tone

Nothing wrong with having young talented players plying their trade in MLS and in some European teams. I am for both.


Fair enough thank you kindly. While I have at times found eternal optimism and positivity around the decisions, mls and talent of up and coming players somewhat frustrating (to the point of emotional childish responses which I regret on my part here) given my own intrinsic tendencies towards skepticism/pessimism, admittedly it is also a trait I admire.

munns5986
Post #17
Saturday July 23, 2016 2:05am

Joined Oct 2012
Total Posts: 259
I am in the camp of if they can play in Europe right now they need to be there. There are different things that factor into playing in Europe but that is what I prefer. I really do hope MLS is a top league one day but I would much rather the US be a top team. That involves plying against the best day in and day out. Right now that is Europe.

MSantoine
Post #18
Monday July 25, 2016 11:39am

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 3,543
The main issue is that there is not a lot of incentive by MLS clubs to develop young talent. Because of no relegation, and the high number of playoffs, teams are almost always "fighting for playoff spots". Because of this teams routinely lean towards the 31-33 yr old career journeyman over the 19 yr old potential star that needs time. In Europe if he's on a good team (see Pulisic) teams can pick spots to give him time, games against far inferior foes. If hes on a mid/low mid table team they no they cant make Europe, and know they are safe from relegation (think teams like Stoke City) then they get integrated and get some good experience. Because of MLS has so much parity no game is a given so they also lose that incentive. Also due to being in North America MLS cant/doesnt loan players to a notch below (ie EPL loaning to Netherlands, La Liga loan to Portugal). Its a real problem in MLS and no obvious solution.

Unfortunately since MLS doesnt seem to want to work with MX, NASL, or some of the good South American Leagues there doesnt seem to be much change on the horizon. It would be great if a team like Orlando City could loan Tommy Redding to a decent league but one just below MLS and let him play 25-30 games this year. Same for guys like Bradford Jamieson and countless others.

dolcem
Post #19
Monday July 25, 2016 10:18pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 1,633
Original post from MSantoine

The main issue is that there is not a lot of incentive by MLS clubs to develop young talent. Because of no relegation, and the high number of playoffs, teams are almost always "fighting for playoff spots". Because of this teams routinely lean towards the 31-33 yr old career journeyman over the 19 yr old potential star that needs time. In Europe if he's on a good team (see Pulisic) teams can pick spots to give him time, games against far inferior foes. If hes on a mid/low mid table team they no they cant make Europe, and know they are safe from relegation (think teams like Stoke City) then they get integrated and get some good experience. Because of MLS has so much parity no game is a given so they also lose that incentive. Also due to being in North America MLS cant/doesnt loan players to a notch below (ie EPL loaning to Netherlands, La Liga loan to Portugal). Its a real problem in MLS and no obvious solution.

Unfortunately since MLS doesnt seem to want to work with MX, NASL, or some of the good South American Leagues there doesnt seem to be much change on the horizon. It would be great if a team like Orlando City could loan Tommy Redding to a decent league but one just below MLS and let him play 25-30 games this year. Same for guys like Bradford Jamieson and countless others.


It's mostly the salary cap. If you play a 19 year old instead of the 31 year old and he improves a lot and turns into a good player, he's just going to ask for a bigger contract and you might not have enough cap room, at which point you'll lose him to free agency. That really kills the incentive to play the 19 year old unless he consistently plays better (tough at that age). In other countries, you want to develop young talent and sell them to make money. Now it is true that the owner of an MLS team does get to keep most of the money if a player is sold abroad, but because of the salary cap, that money can't get reinvested into the squad. No MLS coach is going to try and focus on youth development just to line an owner's pockets. And youth development certainly has never been a strength of American soccer culture, anyway. I mean look at the response I got on here when I tried to suggest that something matters more than the result.

Sadly, I think that most American coaches think the same way, and I just don't think they have the know-how to help young players develop. A lot of MLS academy prodigies have come out over the years and after going pro, their careers crash and burn. And it should be no surprise, since all of these coaches were trained by coaches (either in the early days of the MLS or before) that certainly did not believe that anything else mattered than the result-basically going against the #1 rule of youth development.
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I hate to be the harbinger of bad news, ladies and gentlemen, but Michael Orozco will start for the US men's national team in Jacksonville.
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