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2tone
Ten-Towns
Post #1
Tuesday October 8, 2013 3:04pm

Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts: 4,116
So Danny Barbir the starting CB for the new crop of U-17's is set to join Manchester City's academy.

Good luck to him.

Scout92
Lone Star State(Gun State)
Post #2
Tuesday October 8, 2013 4:40pm

Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts: 858
Nice, I knew there was a few EPL teams after him. Wonder if he is going to play FW or CB at Man city. But I think he made a good decision turning down residency to go abroad with a good club. Good luck to him as well.

admsghs27
Post #3
Tuesday October 8, 2013 4:59pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 2,230
Yea he had been scoutes for a while now.. Many youngsters are being tracked by European giants....

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #4
Tuesday October 8, 2013 5:07pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 948
Not a new phenomenon, but certainly becoming more common. I remember the first time that I heard Kenny Cooper was a ManU academy player...I was stunned! Up until then, I thought all our players came through the college system or straight from high school (like Brek), so any time that our youth development gets recognized as being worthy of producing players that are sought after by the world's top clubs it's a good thing.

Bshredder
Post #5
Tuesday October 8, 2013 6:32pm

Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts: 1,454
It's a good development.

Still, it's hard for any American teenager to move to England without being a dual national with an EU country or being a regular with the U.S national team.

It's will always be rare to see Americans under the 18 in Europe without being an EU dual national. FIFA rules limit it. For a non-EU player under 18 to move to Europe, a player must be in the country with his parents and they must not have moved to the country for football purposes.

It's great when it happens but it highlights the need for the U.S to improve its development within its own boarders.

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #6
Tuesday October 8, 2013 7:21pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 948
Original post from Bshredder
It's great when it happens but it highlights the need for the U.S to improve its development within its own boarders.


Can't necessarily agree there, part of what's holding us back in that department is the league structure and the money. When these teams overseas are pulling down hundreds of millions a season, they can afford to spend heavily on getting the best coaches and trainers for their youth teams.

I think we're doing remarkably well considering, and the fact that more players are starting to be recruited overseas is an indication of that. You're right to say that we still have a long way to go, but when you think about where we were 15-20 years ago right before the WC and before MLS, you must admit that we've come leaps and bounds.

admsghs27
Post #7
Tuesday October 8, 2013 7:32pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 2,230
Original post from recycledhumans

Can't necessarily agree there, part of what's holding us back in that department is the league structure and the money. When these teams overseas are pulling down hundreds of millions a season, they can afford to spend heavily on getting the best coaches and trainers for their youth teams.

I think we're doing remarkably well considering, and the fact that more players are starting to be recruited overseas is an indication of that. You're right to say that we still have a long way to go, but when you think about where we were 15-20 years ago right before the WC and before MLS, you must admit that we've come leaps and bounds.


Theoretically The best coaches/trainers in the world are Americans.. If that was the case then most coaches, trainers in leagues around would be American.. Usa has Really good coaches, and trainers in our youth development teams, is a matter of keeping our best Talent, But then again Players know the how big an opportunity is to go abroad and have the chance to develop on some of the best teams in the world.. We have plenty of talented kids that could compete with all the teams in the world from a youth stand point.. just recently usa did very good in an under 17 tournament in Spain, and easily Beat Real Madrid's under 17, And most of our players were from youth academies, mls, only a few abroad players..

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #8
Tuesday October 8, 2013 8:19pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 948
Original post from admsghs27

Theoretically The best coaches/trainers in the world are Americans.. If that was the case then most coaches, trainers in leagues around would be American.. Usa has Really good coaches, and trainers in our youth development teams, is a matter of keeping our best Talent, But then again Players know the how big an opportunity is to go abroad and have the chance to develop on some of the best teams in the world.. We have plenty of talented kids that could compete with all the teams in the world from a youth stand point.. just recently usa did very good in an under 17 tournament in Spain, and easily Beat Real Madrid's under 17, And most of our players were from youth academies, mls, only a few abroad players..


While I do see your point and don't disagree that we are way ahead of the curve, but when you look at the rate of players that come through a RM or Barca or ManU academy that end up signing pro contracts versus how many are doing the coming out of this country, I think (without crunching those numbers myself) that we're still in need of a lot of improvement. Admittedly, this may have some to do with the fact that there are a lot more clubs in Europe and more opportunity for young players to find a club...but given how many players are actually being persuaded to come to America and play for our MLS, USL and NASL teams I can't imagine that the "graduation" rate here won't improve rapidly as well.

Bshredder
Post #9
Tuesday October 8, 2013 8:29pm

Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts: 1,454
Original post from recycledhumans

Can't necessarily agree there, part of what's holding us back in that department is the league structure and the money. When these teams overseas are pulling down hundreds of millions a season, they can afford to spend heavily on getting the best coaches and trainers for their youth teams.

I think we're doing remarkably well considering, and the fact that more players are starting to be recruited overseas is an indication of that. You're right to say that we still have a long way to go, but when you think about where we were 15-20 years ago right before the WC and before MLS, you must admit that we've come leaps and bounds.


I think we're talking past each other.

All I was saying is that the US can't rely on its young players going over seas for development.

recycledhumans
DFWTX
Post #10
Tuesday October 8, 2013 9:19pm

Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts: 948
Original post from Bshredder

I think we're talking past each other.

All I was saying is that the US can't rely on its young players going over seas for development.


I agree, and don't think that they should. My point is that while they're still the elite development center of the soccer universe, we should let as many young players go as would wish to.

Being from Dallas and having little to cheer for these past few seasons, I've kept a glancing eye on the academy teams. We've had a lot of players called up to the US youth system over the years and this past U15 (I think) roster had more FCD players than any other team. I can tell first hand that the club level growth of youth development has taken off and is extremely important in growing the game nationally, but until the financial allure of staying at home outweighs the greener grass of Europe, we will be doomed to remain a feeder league.


A big question for U.S. fans heading into the World Cup is surely on Jozy Altidore and just what is plaguing the young striker at Sunderland.
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